All the research indicates that I am a high risk for contracting COVID-19, yet I am not considered eligible for the vaccine yet. How is that fair?

The vaccine manufacturers, CDC, and the state are all committed to getting the vaccine to everyone as soon as possible. ACIP is a group of medical and public health experts that develop recommendations on how to use vaccines to control diseases in the U.S. ACIP decides on vaccine prioritization recommendations by reviewing the FDA information, clinical trial data, and other information. Initially, the limited supply of vaccine will only be available to those determined to be most at risk of exposure to COVID-19. As the vaccine supply increases, more people will be added to those prioritized until it is available to the adult population at large. When vaccine is widely available, healthcare clinics, pharmacies, and drive-through and walk-through clinics will likely provide vaccinations.

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1. What is an Emergency Use Authorization? How is safety taken into account?
2. Will the COVID-19 vaccine give me COVID-19?
3. How do vaccines work in our bodies? Are there different types?
4. What is an mRNA vaccine? How is it different from past vaccines we have had in the U.S.?
5. If I already had COVID-19, should I get vaccinated?
6. Will getting a COVID-19 vaccine cause me to test positive on COVID-19 viral tests?
7. When will I be able to get a vaccine? How will they be distributed?
8. All the research indicates that I am a high risk for contracting COVID-19, yet I am not considered eligible for the vaccine yet. How is that fair?
9. How is a vaccine developed in the U.S.? What kind of regulatory process is there to determine if it is safe and effective?
10. What is 'Operation Warp Speed'?
11. Where can I find more information on vaccine preparedness?